THE ARTIST'S WAY

DEVELOPMENT THROUGH THE CREATIVE PROCESS.

Van Gogh, Monet or Picasso? Encourage the inner artist in your child.

Head-to-Toe Wash

Two products in one: gently cleanses both baby’s delicate skin and fine hair without drying.

Give her or him big crayons to use on paper. Holding a crayon or marker and figuring out how to use it on paper is a great way to develop fine motor skills. Some children scribble back and forth and up and down with wild, exaggerated arm motions; others have more control and keep their movements smaller. Either way, these pictures look perfect when displayed on the family fridge.

Learn the different stages of artistic development.

Instead of “The Blue Period”, most likely, your little one will start with “The Scribble Period”. Your child's masterpiece of lines is a form of expression. It actually means something. Your toddler is learning, developing, and communicating. This scribble period typically lasts until the age of four. It begins as a display of movement, but your child will learn to associate scribble with the form he or she is creating.

Around the age of three and a half, your little artist will begin to name her or his marks. Even though the scribbles do not appear different, the way of thinking has developed. She or he has progressed to a point where they are thinking in imaginative terms. Your toddler now has control and direction over those lines and draws with expression and communication.

Suddenly a horizontal line is the ocean, and a vertical line is a tree. Mommy and Daddy look like a fiddlestick composition, and an image of your house may look like a mess. Slowly but surely, scribbles become a repetitious series of lines that develop into symbols.

Young children love to make masterpieces and are even happier seeing their art displayed proudly. Art Gallery. A cute alternative to the standard fridge door gallery:

  • You need nails, heavy twine, wooden clothespins – and a spare stretch of wall.
  • Construct your own decorative clothesline by placing nails along the wall three to four feet apart in a straight, horizontal line (if you go too much longer than that your line will sag).
  • At each nail use additional twine to tie a small bow to mask the nail head.
  • Secure your child's art using wooden clothespins every four inches or so.
  • If the artwork is flimsy, clip heavier matte paper behind it.
  • For an added touch, purchase small wooden shapes, paint them with acrylic paints, and write your child's name in permanent ink on the shapes. Glue each shape onto the front of a wooden clothespin.
  • For an added touch, purchase small wooden shapes, paint them with acrylic paints, and write your child's name in permanent ink on the shapes. Glue each shape onto the front of a wooden clothespin.
  • You can also create "gallery tags" for the art. On another piece of paper, about the size of a business card, write something about the picture, "Flowers in the garden" or "Mom is cooking" – and hang these from clothes pins next to the pictures.
  • Trying
  • Pregnancy
  • Newborn
  • Baby
  • Toddler
You can click on the timeline depending on what age your baby is and read articles